Buhari Meets With Tinubu And Bisi Akande

Buhari Meets With Tinubu And Bisi Akande

Buhari Meets With Tinubu And Bisi Akande


The National Leader of the ruling All Progressives Congress, Bola Tinubu; and the party’s chieftain, , met with President  at the State House, Abuja, on Tuesday.
While the details of the meeting were not revealed, the President’s Special Assistant on New Media, Bashir Ahmad, tweeted it via his verified Twitter handle, @BashirAhmaad.
He wrote:
“Earlier today, President @MBuhari had a meeting with National Leader of our great party, APC, Asiwaju Ahmed  and the Party’s Chieftain, Chief  at the State House, Abuja.”

See another photo below:


Senate Approves N30,000 As Minimum Wage

Senate Approves N30,000 As Minimum Wage

Senate Approves N30,000 As Minimum Wage


The Nigerian Senate has approved N30,000 as the new national minimum wage.
The approval came subsequent to the submission of the report of the ad hoc committee set up to review the minimum wage. The committee was headed by Senator Francis Alimikhena.
The decision was taken at the plenary session on Tuesday.
A request was also made to the Nigerian government to submit a supplementary budget, which would include the structure of the new national minimum wage.
The House of Representatives had also earlier approved the new figure as the national minimum wage.

Breaking: Buhari wins the presidential election in Kogi

Breaking: Buhari wins the presidential election in Kogi

Breaking: Buhari wins the presidential election in Kogi

    
AS INEC DECLARE KOGI EAST SENATE ELECTION INCONCLUSIVE
**SO FAR: APC 1 SENATE, 7 REPS; PDP – 1 SENATE, 1 REP; ADC – 1 REP
BY BOLUWAJI OBAHOPO, LOKOJA

President Muhammadu Buhari of the All Progressives Congress (APC) has won the presidential election in Kogi State having polled overall votes of 285, 894 to defeat his main challenger, Alhaji Atiku Abubakar who polled 218,207 votes.



The presidential results declared by the Kogi State Collation Officer, Prof Michael Adikwu of the University of Abuja, showed that Buhari won in 14 out of the 21 LGAs of the state while Atiku won in seven.

Buhari led Atiku with a wide margin of 67,687 votes.
Breakdown of the result declared is as below:

Ankpa
APC- 21,109
PDP-16,749

Bassa
APC- 7,377
PDP- 10,137

Adavi
APC-24,843
PDP-10,059

Ajaokuta
APC- 13,253
PDP- 10, 710

Ijumu
APC- 8,507
PDP- 12,423

Kogi
APC- 16, 588
PDP- 10,392

Mopa-Muro
APC- 3,646
PDP-5,336

Ibaji
APC- 13,545
PDP – 10,307

Ofu
APC- 13,171
PDP- 10,374

Lokoja
APC- 24,983
PDP- 18,351

Ogori-Magongo
APC- 2,323
PDP- 1,956

Okehi
APC- 18,222
PDP- 11,965

Okene
APC- 37,617
7,839

Olamaboro
APC- 12,229
PDP- 11, 325

Omala
APC- 8,206
PDP- 11,815

Kabba-Bunu
APC- 9,131
PDP- 14,888

Yagba East
APC- 5,687
PDP- 8,841

Yagba West
APC- 7,175
PDP- 9,419

Dekina
APC- 21,392
PDP- 10, 455

Idah
APC-9,240
PDP- 8,784

Igalamela
APC- 7,650
PDP- 6,082

In a related development, the Kogi East Senatorial Election has been declared Inconclusive.

The returning officer, Prof Rotimi Ajayi of the Federal University Lokoja announced the result at the Senatorial collation Centre, Idah as follows; Jibrin Isah Echocho Of APC -113,772, Aidoko Ali Of PDP – 69,131, Victor Adoji Of ADC – 30,696.

Prof Ajayi said elections were canceled in 129 polling units therefore, declared the election inconclusive.

From the election declared so far in Kogi, PDP has won 1 senate and 1 Reps seat, APC won 2 senates and 7 Reps seats, while ADC won 1 rep seat.
End.

Buhari overwhelmingly sweeps 32 LGAs in Kanons-in-kano

Buhari overwhelmingly sweeps 32 LGAs in Kanons-in-kano

Buhari overwhelmingly sweeps 32 LGAs in Kanons-in-kano
Buhari overwhelmingly sweeps 32 LGAs in Kano as Atiku struggles for 25% of the votes.
The following are results of the presidential election submitted to the Kano State Collation Officer.
Officials count votes in front of voters during the presidential and parliamentary elections on February 23, 2019, at a polling station in Port Harcourt, southern Nigeria. – Nigerians began voting for a new president on February 23, after a week-long delay that has raised political tempers, sparked conspiracy claims and stoked fears of violence. Some 120,000 polling stations began opening from 0700 GMT, although there were indications of a delay in the delivery of some materials and deployment of staff, AFP reporters said. (Photo AFP)
Tudun Wada LGA
APC: 38,865
PDP: 10,707
Code:041
Reg Voters: 125,667
Accredited Voters:54,555
Valid Votes: 49,991
Rejected Votes:1067
Votes Cast:51,058
Tsanyawa LGA
APC: 25,823
PDP: 5,399
Code: 040
Reg Voters:
Accredited Voters:
Valid Votes: 31,727
Rejected Votes:1,185
Votes Casted:32,912
Sumaila LGA
APC: 34,609
PDP: 4,9044
Code:036
Reg Voters: 107,361
Accredited Voters:42,624
Valid Votes: 40,163
Rejected Votes:1,667
Votes Casted:41,830
Gwarzo LGA
APC: 33,581
PDP: 10,682
Code:019
Reg Voters: 105,341
Accredited Voters: 47,041
Valid Votes: 44,855
Rejected Votes: 1,640
Votes Casted: 46,395
Kibiya LGA
APC: 18,085
PDP: 11,028
Code:023
Reg Voters: 72,715
Accredited Voters:30,692
Valid Votes: 29,408
Rejected Votes: 821
Votes Casted: 30,229
Rano LGA
APC: 23,855
PDP: 7,055
Code: 032
Reg Voters: 76,966
Accredited Voters:33,118
Valid Votes: 31,444
Rejected Votes:1007
Votes Casted: 32,451
Ajingi LGA
APC: 21,458
PDP: 5,267
Code: 001
Reg Voters: 72,182
Accredited Voters: 29,470
Valid Votes: 27,491
Rejected Votes:1,575
Votes Casted:29,066
Gezawa LGA
APC: 29,954
PDP: 8,246
Code: 017
Reg Voters: 103,527
Accredited Voters:41,804
Valid Votes: 39,735
Rejected Votes: 1861
Votes Casted: 41,596
Gwale LGA
APC: 50,834
PDP: 12,283
Code:018
Reg Voters: 226,792
Accredited Voters:68,407
Valid Votes: 64,459
Rejected Votes: 2,922
Votes Casted:67,381
Bebeji LGA
APC: 26,023
PDP: 8,190
Code: 004
Reg Voters: 76,740
Accredited Voters:35,839
Valid Votes: 34,635
Rejected Votes:648
Votes Casted:35,278
Gaya LGA
APC: 25,864
PDP: 6,577
Code:016
Reg Voters: 93,834
Accredited Voters:35,758
Valid Votes: 33,295
Rejected Votes:1,127
Votes Casted:34,422
Albasu LGA
APC: 36,412
PDP: 10,285
Code:002
Reg Voters: 89,684
Accredited Voters:38,657
Valid Votes: 37,083
Rejected Votes:1,019
Votes Casted:38,102
Warawa LGA
APC: 19,073
PDP: 6,101
Code: 043
Reg Voters: 68,951
Accredited Voters: 27,862
Valid Votes: 24,389
Rejected Votes: 1017
Votes Casted: 25,406
Garun Malam LGA
Code: 015
APC: 23,810
PDP: 4,861
Registered Voters: 73,027
Accredited Voters 31,641
Valid Votes: 29,004
Votes Casted: 30,986
Tofa LGA
Code: 039
APC: 19,984
PDP: 7,732
Registered Voters: 71,348
Accredited Voters 30,227
Valid Votes: 28,101
Rejected Votes:1,651
Votes Casted: 30,986
Kunchi LGA
Code: 026
APC: 20,375
PDP: 4,983
Registered Voters: 58,334
Accredited Voters 27,281
Valid Votes: 25,753
Rejected Votes:1,142
Votes Casted: 26,895
Magwai LGA
Code: 03
APC: 23,375
PDP: 10,584
Registered Voters: 89,134
Accredited Voters 36,929
Valid Votes: 34,601
Rejected Votes: 1,096
Votes Casted: 35,697
Garko LGA
APC: 22,356
PDP: 2840
Code:014
Reg Voters: 91,656
Accredited Voters:27,856
Valid Votes: 25,955
Rejected Votes: 1299
Votes Cast: 27,254
Doguwa LGA
APC: 25454
PDP: 7013
Code:011
Reg Voters: 71,663
Accredited Voters:34,610
Valid Votes: 32,735
Rejected Votes: 649
Votes Cast: 33,384
Kabo LGA
APC: 29,482
PDP: 8,955
Code:
Reg Voters: 84,423
Accredited Voters:41510
Valid Votes: 39036
Rejected Votes: 1634
Votes Cast: 40,670
Kiru LGA
APC: 36,739
PDP: 12,205
Code: 24
Reg Voters:123,058
Accredited Voters: 52,166
Valid Votes: 49,677
Rejected Votes: 1557
Votes Cast: 51,234
Shanono LGA
APC: 24,173
PDP: 8,469
Code: 35
Reg Voters:69,796
Accredited Voters: 35,135
Valid Votes: 33,386
Rejected Votes: 1054
Votes Cast: 34,440
Danbatta LGA
APC: 31850
PDP: 6,947
Code:08
Reg Voters: 112,501
Accredited Voters: 43,772
Valid Votes: 39,720
Rejected Votes:2,119
Votes Cast: 41,839
Wudil LGA
APC: 28,755
PDP: 5,108
Code:44
Reg Voters:107,507
Accredited Voters:36,899
Valid Votes: 34754
Rejected Votes:1250
Votes Cast: 36004
Bichi LGA
APC: 42,714
PDP: 11,050
Code: 05
Reg Voters:131,059
Accredited Voters: 58,707
Valid Votes: 54931
Rejected Vote: 2596
Votes Cast: 57,527
Ungogo LGA
APC: 51,842
PDP: 10,475
Minjibir LGA
APC: 27,725
PDP: 2840
There are 11 LGAs left to determine whether Atiku will find a level play ground in Kano

Atiku Abubakar abused in new video

Atiku Abubakar abused in new video


The presidential candidate for the  People’s Democratic Party (PDP) Atiku Abubakar has been outrightly abused in a recent video uploaded by a YouTube user.
The video which was uploaded with the username Babafemi Yola contained an animated illustration portraying Atiku as a spider with corrupt foreign associates trapped in his web.
The video which was well crafted for the purpose has a background vocal alleging Atiku’sconnection with several offshore companies with names that have allegedly funneled several billions of Naira out of Nigeria.
It also vividly implicated names it claims are Atiku’s foreign friends and business associates that are currently under scrutiny for corrupt practices.
There is no indication of the video being orchestrated by any rival political contenders or party. Even the name behind the upload matches no known profile as details were meticulously left out.
Here’s the video:
Prior to this, an online campaign photo advertisement about the PDP candidate’s plan for Nigerian youths has in it a drawing of the incumbent president Mohammadu Buhari deserted by the youths who stand behind Atiku instead.
Share with us what you think about this in the comment section. Also share our updates with friends on the available social media platforms.

Exposed: See The NBET MD Who Raked In Millions Through 'Fraudulent Contracts'

Exposed: See The NBET MD Who Raked In Millions Through 'Fraudulent Contracts'

Exposed: See The NBET MD Who Raked In Millions Through 'Fraudulent Contracts'

Marilyn Amobi, managing director of the Nigeria Bulk Electricity trading Plc (NBET), fraudulently paid at least N2 billion to two power generating companies, documents obtained by Leaks NG have shown. 
The documents also revealed that Amobi, who was made the substantive MD of NBET in July 2016, was also involved in a series of corruption allegations such as subversion of board approvals and infraction of procurement laws.
FRAUDULENT PAYMENTS TO GENCOs
A few weeks after she was confirmed managing director of NBET, the organisation that manages the electricity pool in the country’s electricity supply industry, Amobi started overpaying two power generating companies – Omotosho Electric Genco and Olorunsogo Electric Company – in flagrant violation of the details of a power purchase agreement (PPA) the companies signed with the government in February and August 2016, respectively.
The PPA is an agreement between NBET and power generating plants for the sale and purchase of energy generated by the plants. Embedded within the PPA are the gas supply agreement (GSA) that covers the supply of natural gas to the generating plant and the gas transportation agreement (GTA), which is an agreement between gas transporters and power generating plants.
According to the PPA, to qualify for full payment, generating plants must provide evidence that they have active GSA and GTA or else the power purchase agreement would be deemed inactive and would only receive payment for the power they supplied.
“Seller (Omotosho Genco) hereby agrees that any claim for Available Capacity payment under the PPA are conditional on the Seller providing evidence acceptable to the Buyer (NBET) confirming that it has a legally binding and enforceable Gas Supply and Aggregation Agreement and Gas Transportation Agreement, in accordance with clause 3.2.2 and 4.2.1 of the PPA,” the agreement obtained by Leaks NG stated.
However, despite the fact that Omotosho did not provide evidence of gas supply aggregation and transportation, the company continued to tender request for full payment of 20 months. According to the document in possession of Leaks NG, the over-invoicing was detected in October 2017 following an NBET internal audit.
On September 22, 2016, NBET had written to Omotosho requesting that it fulfill the condition for the PPA. The generating company was first given a 30-day grace to provide the necessary document. The window to provide the document was later extended to 90 days yet it never provided the document.
For instance, in June 2017, Omotosho supplied energy to the tune of 33.16 megawatts but invoiced up to 161.74 megawatts. This implies that Omotosho laid claim to an excess of 128.58 megawatts as excess capacity for the cycle. For this capacity, Omotosho requested for payment of N1,023,532,574 instead of N209,824,177, leaving an excess of N813,708,397 for the capacity in June 2016.
Similarly, Olorunsogo Power Plc, whose PPA took effect from August 2014 in the said month, tendered 11.9 megawatts for energy while 197.83 as capacity. Since the PPA was not active, the capacity ought to be equal to the energy to make the firm qualify for payment as stated in the agreement.
Olorunsogo issued an invoice of N1, 251, 881, 528 for capacity for June 2016 as against N75, 363, 267 calculated by its actual energy. The difference is an over-invoicing of N1, 176, 518, 261. For both firms, the over-invoicing amounts to N1, 990, 226, 658 as excess in just one month, June 2016.
Leaks NG could not lay hold to all invoices issued by the companies but the two obtained showed that NBET made partial payments to the companies. In one of the invoices, Amobi paid Omotosho N339, 813, 418 in October 2016 -the fund was part payment for July 2016 energy and capacity.
On the same date: October 11, 2016, NBET paid Olorunsogo N372, 498, 731 also as part payment for July. These payments were clearly in breach of the PPA and the Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC) order of transitional stage electricity market (TEM).
Order IV of The TEM states that: “Gencos without effective PPAs shall be paid for their delivered energy and delivered capacity by NBET (Delivered capacity for the purposes of this order means the capacity equivalent of the energy delivered at Gencos busbar.”
These illegal payments wouldn’t have been possible without Amobi’s insistence. While the internal audit of NBET refused to process the payment, Amobi signed the July payment on October 13, 2017, assuming the role of internal audit in violation of financial regulation.
This is a breach of Section 1705 of the financial regulations which states that “the Head of Internal Audit Unit in all ministries/extra-ministerial offices and other arms of government shall ensure that 100 per cent pre-payment audit of all checked and passed vouchers is carried out and the vouchers forwarded under security schedule direct to the appropriate Central Pay Office for payment. Checked and passed vouchers received in the internal audit Unit must be promptly dealt with and, under no circumstances shall a voucher be held in that unit for more than forty-eight (48) hours.”
ILLEGAL PAYMENT TO LAW FIRMS
Sometimes in 2014, NBET wrote the Bureau of Public Procurement (BPP) to request the agency sign off on power procurement and retroactive no objection in procurement. The request simply means that NBET requests to be excluded from being subjected to BPP act in its power purchase agreement. The request was declined by BPP.
In a response dated April 29, 2014, BPP stated that NBET, like other agencies, must follow due procurement process in power procurement.
BPP noted in its reply, “That if section 5 (a) of PPA was intended to exclude some sectors like the Power Sector, it would have been stated clearly. Consequently, giving NBET a one-off approval for NBET’s power procurement process would not only amount to a contravention of the Act, but it would also open a floodgate of similar requests thereby engendering confusion in the system.
“It is pertinent for NBET to note that electricity (being goods) can only be procured within one of the procedures stated in part 42.4 of standard bidding documents.
“The bureau therefore strongly advises that NBET should consult the Public Procurement Regulations, manuals for complex projects and standard bidding documents for procurement of goods, as this would assist NBET in complying with extant procurement rules and regulations.”
Marilyn Amobi
However, the management of NBET, then under the leadership of Rumundaka Wonodi, its inaugural managing director, was unsatisfied with the position of BPP. The agency sought legal advice on the way forward. On June 1 2015, NBET advertised a notice for an expression of interest to engage lawyers in such cases, more specifically on BPP’s response.
According to the advert, the successful law firm is expected to discharge such duties as, “General, corporate, commercial and administrative law, with a view to advising NBET on general commercial and contract matters, providing legal opinions as necessary, and advising on various civil law.”
According to a report by NBET’s evaluation committee, three firms: Azinge and Azinge, Chukwuka Ugwu and Associate and John Erameh submitted their bids. The process was however truncated upon advice by the internal audit department of NBET.
Surprisingly, in April 2017, two years after, the internal audit received a request from Amobi for payment of N30 million to two firms. Amobi wanted Azinge and Azinge to be paid a contract sum of N14 million and Aelex N16 million respectively. The process that led to this request was one replete with infractions and breach of public procurement law.
It is worthy of note that the procurement process was stopped in 2015 and if there would be a need for the services of law firms in 2017, the engagement is supposed to take a entire new process according to procurement laws.
The BPP act in Section 16(1)(b) states the process of procurement; “based only on procurement plan supported by prior budgetary appropriations and no procurement proceedings shall be formalised until the procuring entity has ensured that funds  are available to meet the obligations and subject to the threshold in the regulations made by the Bureau, has obtained a “Certificate of ‘No Objection’ to Contract Award” from the Bureau.”
There was no new advertisement or procurement process but Amobi presented the two firms for payment.
Surprisingly, one of the firms laying claim to payment, Aelex, was not part of the 2015 process, as the firm was not captured in the evaluation report.
ILLEGAL PAYMENT TO CONSULTANT
In 2016, NEXANT, a software and energy firm, engaged a former staff of Power Holding Company of Nigeria (PHCN), Uzoma Achinaya, to provide advisory and analytics work for NBET.
According to the arrangement, Achinaya would work for NBET for a period, present a report to NEXANT and claim his payment from NEXANT. This indeed happened but instead of NEXANT to pay the consultant, NBET’s leadership decided to pay him despite not being party of the engagement agreement.
On January 23 2017, Achinaya wrote Amobi requesting NBET to pay him the sum of N7 million advance payment for the work he had done so far.
“I refer to the advisory and analytics work that l have done for NBET on the sustainable solutions to the Liquidity Challenges in the Nigerian Electricity industry.
“I appreciate the steps NBET management is taking to resolve the issues with NEXANT regarding my contract which has resulted in the delayed payment of my fees for the services rendered. However, I have some very urgent family commitments, including school fees for my children, which need immediate funding. It will be appreciated if I can be granted a payment advance in the sum of Seven Million Naira (N7, 000, 000.00}, in lieu of the money I am owed for the work already done, to enable me meet some of these commitments.
“The amount should be recovered from my payment when the issues with NEXANT are finally resolved.”
The irregularities in the request were flagged by the internal audit, which declined payment to Achinaya.
The audit department argued that it declined the payment because the Amobi’s N7.5 million request was above her N2.5 approval threshold and that the process of contracting was not subjected to any procurement process.
Internal audit also argued that the consultant does not have a tax identification number (TIN) as stipulated by procurement law, inside sources told Leaks NG.
To bypass the procurement part, Amobi allegedly directed the Parastatal Tenders Board of NBET to seek consideration and approval for the requested fund. The board submitted its report in March claiming that due process was followed in the award of the consultancy contract. The memorandum for consideration and approval indicated that the bid was opened on March 1, 2017, with a deadline of March 6.
At the end of the process, two individuals were said to have emerged out of five expressions of interest received; Joe Agah with 59.7 total weighted scores and Uzoma Achinaya with 95.1. The contract was later awarded to Achinaya at the sum of N25, 850, 000.
Even at that, the board did a shabby job in the cover-up. The consultant started work in 2016, requested for payment in January 2017 for his ongoing work but the NBET management instituted a post-dated procurement process to make the payment possible.
TRANSFER OF STAFF WITHOUT BOARD’S APPROVAL
In 2017, Amobi made a request to the accountant-general for officials from his office to be transferred to NBET to head the internal audit and finance departments. Inside sources alleged that she made this request because she felt the officials who headed the department at NBET were standing in her way.
The request was granted in June 2017. The AGF posted Hauwa Bello from the National Centre for Women Development (NCWD) to head the internal audit. He also posted Sambo Abdullahi to the Learning and Development, a newly created department at NBET. Waziri Bintube of the finance department was reposted to Risk and Guarantee, another department created by Amobi allegedly to victimise the two top officials.
A month earlier, Amobi had facilitated the transfer of two people, Ajulo Adesola from the National Agency for Science and Engineering (NASENI) and Acho Onyechege from the ministry of Niger Delta Affairs to NBET as treasury officers.
Though the new postings were communicated in a letter by AGF on 30 May 2018, they flouted the requirement of NBET charter which places the responsibility of recommending postings within the agency on the human resources committee of NBET.
Section 2.4 (b) of the charter state that the Human Resource Committee shall “‘review and make recommendations to the Board for approval of the Company’s organisational structure and any proposed amendments.”
Although the accountant-general reserves the authority to approve such reviews, the office does not have the power to make postings.
AMOBI EVASIVE, ABUSIVE
When contacted to respond to the series of allegations against her, Amobi, rained abuses Leaks NG reporter.
Without first listening to the reporters’s questions, in in a statement, replete with swear words, the MD she said she would not comment to any of the allegations because the issues are in court.
“If they are things about NBET that are currently in court, there is really no need…some of them are in court. I’m sure some people brought this to you,” she said.
“You’ve written a story about us before of us sending some people to America which of course didn’t happen. These are issues that are with EFCC, ICPC and even in the court.”
After calling the reporter many unprintable names, Amobi ended the call.
***
Source:

Nigeria since independence 1960

Nigeria since independence 1960

Nigeria since independence 1960


Key events in the history of Nigeria since independence from Britain in 1960:
Map-of-Nigeria
– First Coup –
In January 1966 the first in a series of military coups takes place amid dissatisfaction with progress after colonial rule.
Significantly, it is also triggered by the fact that most high government office holders are Hausa-speaking Muslims from Nigeria’s north.
The main figures behind the coup are ethnic Igbo officers, from the mainly Christian south.
In a counter-coup the same July, Igbo officers are killed and a brutal pogrom of Igbo civilians occurs in the north, forcing thousands to flee to their southeastern heartland.
– Biafra war –
For 30 months between 1967 and 1970, civil war rages in the southeast after Igbo separatists declare an independent republic of Biafra.
More than one million dies, most of them Igbos, from the effects of war, famine, and disease.
– succession of generals –
In 1975 General Yakubu Gowon is overthrown by General Murtala Mohammed, who is assassinated the following year.
General Olusegun Obasanjo takes charge and rules until 1979 when he becomes Africa’s first military leader to hand over power voluntarily to an elected president.
President Shehu Shagari holds on until 1983 when he is toppled by General Muhammadu Buhari — the current civilian president seeking a second term.
Buhari is himself ousted in 1985 by General Ibrahim Babangida, who resigns in 1993.

– Activist executed –
Plans for the civilian rule are shelved after the military cancels elections widely seen to have been won by businessman Moshood “MKO” Abiola. General Sani Abacha takes over.
In 1995 writer Ken Saro-Wiwa, who fought for a fairer share of the oil wealth for the people of Niger Delta region, is executed after an internationally condemned trial.
After Abacha dies in office, Obasanjo returns as civilian president in 1999 and is re-elected in 2003.

– Islamic law in the north –
In 2000, a year after the civilian rule is restored, 12 states in the mainly Muslim north opt to reintroduce Islamic Sharia law in parallel to the state and federal legal system.
Over the next few years, ethnic and religious tensions mount, particularly in the central states, leading to violence that leaves thousands dead.

– Boko Haram emerges –
In 2009 a group known as Boko Haram launches an uprising in northeastern Nigeria, sparking days of clashes with the military in which some 800 people are killed.
The radical Islamist group begins an insurgency with dozens of attacks targeting schools, churches, mosques, and symbols of the secular state.

– Deadly post-poll unrest –
In 2011 Goodluck Jonathan, a Christian from the south wins presidential elections against Buhari, the former military ruler from the Muslim north.
Rioting breaks out in mainly northern states, leaving nearly 1,000 people dead in days.

– Boko Haram escalation –
In 2014 Boko Haram kidnaps 276 schoolgirls at Chibok in Borno state, sparking international outrage.
In August the group proclaims a “caliphate” in areas in the northeast under its control.

– Buhari elected president –
Buhari beats Jonathan in 2015 elections on pledges to defeat Boko Haram and corruption. It is the first time in Nigeria’s history the opposition has defeated an incumbent president at the ballot box.
In 2015 an offensive by armies of Nigeria, Chad, Cameroon, and Niger drives the jihadists out of the captured territory.

– Boko Haram split –
Boko Haram splits into two rival factions — one led by long-time leader Abubakar Shekau, the other by Abu Mus’ab al-Barnawi, whose father, Muhammad Yusuf, founded the group.
Both pledge allegiance to the Islamic State group but IS only recognizes Barnawi, whose group steps up attacks on military bases in 2018.

Lagos Stadium agog for Buhari’s Next Level campaign

Lagos Stadium agog for Buhari’s Next Level campaign

Lagos Stadium agog for Buhari’s Next Level campaign


The Teslim Balogun Stadium Lagos, on Saturday bubbled with a lot of activities as residents and the All Progressives’ Congress (APC) faithful thronged the venue for the 2019 Presidential campaign rally.
Buhari in Lagos re-election rally
Reports have it that the atmosphere was charged with excitement as thousands of people holding brooms sang and chanted APC slogans while awaiting the arrival of President Muhammadu Buhari.
While supporters in APC attires and dresses were waiting as at 11:54a.m., musicians like King Wasiu Ayinde and some other upcoming acts delighted them with various musical renditions.

Nollywood personalities like Jide Kosoko, Funke Daramola and `Remi Surutu’ were also around, adding spice to the gathering.

Market women, youths holding brooms and APC flags danced endlessly to rave songs being dished out by the DJ.

Members of various interest groups and special groups, including people with disabilities, were in their hundreds chanting “Sai Buhari, Sai Buhari,’’ dancing to music.

Some of the prominent personalities present so far included Sen. Olamilekan Adeola (Lagos-West), a key member of the Presidential Campaign Organisation, Mr. Festus Keyamo, South West APC Woman Leader, Mrs. Kemi Nelson, and APC Chairman in Lagos, Alhaji Tunde Balogun.

Mr Tunde Braimoh (Kosofe) and Mr Bisi Yusuf (Alimosho 1) were among some of the state lawmakers present.

The president was still being awaited as at 12:05 p.m.

Revealed: Check Out The New List Of The World's Highest Paid Footballers

Revealed: Check Out The New List Of The World's Highest Paid Footballers

Revealed: Check Out The New List Of The World's Highest Paid Footballers


Lionel Messi is the best-paid player on the planet as he rakes in an astonishing £7.3million a month before tax – nearly twice the amount that Cristiano Ronaldo does at Juventus.
In L'Equipe's annual salary report, the French news outlet revealed who the 10 best-paid footballers in Europe are going by monthly wage before tax.
Of these 10, five play in Spain, a pair play in France and England respectively while just the one player features in Italy.
It's no secret that modern-day players are paid huge sums of money but the amount Messi receives on a monthly basis is extraordinary – even by footballers standards.
The Barcelona talisman signed a new contract in November 2017 which propelled him to the top of the list, beating long-term rival Ronaldo in second who earns a staggering £4.1m (€4.7m) a month before tax.
Surprisingly, coming in third is Antoine Griezmann of Atletico Madrid who earns £2.9m (€3.3m) a month following his well-publicized contract renewal before the World Cup this summer.
Paris Saint-Germain's Neymar follows Griezmann with reported monthly earnings of £2.7m (€3.06m) while Luis Suarez completes the top five with a monthly wage of £2.5m (€2.9m). 
Real Madrid's Gareth Bale (£2.2m), Philippe Coutinho (£2m), Alexis Sanchez (£2m), Kylian Mbappe (£1.5m) and Mesut Ozil (£1.4m) complete the list.
See the full list below.
1. Lionel Messi – £7.3million
2. Cristiano Ronaldo – £4.1million
3. Antoine Griezmann – £2.9million
4. Neymar – £2.7million
5. Luis Suarez – £2.5million
6. Gareth Bale – £2.2million
7. Philippe Coutinho – £2million
8. Alexis Sanchez – £2million
9. Kylian Mbappe – £1.5million
10. Mesut Ozil – £1.4million 
Bayern Munich's Robert Lewandowski failed to break into the top 10 list with a reported monthly earning of £1.2m (€1.33m) in the Bundesliga. 
L'Equipe also released the top earners in Ligue 1, and unsurprisingly, the top five was dominated by PSG players.
With Neymar and Mbappe leading the way, Edinson Cavani (£1.3m), Thiago Silva (£1m) and Angel Di Maria (£1m) complete the list.
The French newspaper also reported that Mbappe's monthly wage increase by £160,000 (€180,000) between his first and second season at the Parisian club following his big-money switch from Monaco.
**

The Message Nigerians Must Deliver To Buhari Next Week - Dele Momodu

The Message Nigerians Must Deliver To Buhari Next Week - Dele Momodu

The Message Nigerians Must Deliver To Buhari Next Week - Dele Momodu


President Muhammadu Buhari
Fellow Nigerians, please, permit me to make some quick clarifications in this season of general bickering and mutual distrust and spiteful hatred.
One. I do not work for any campaign organisation. I’m supporting the PDP candidate, Alhaji Atiku Abubakar, same way I voluntarily supported Major General Muhammadu Buhari in 2015. I do so because there is no viable or electable alternative among the fringe candidates. I believe it is within my fundamental right of association and freedom of speech to support whosoever I wish. Similarly, I respect the rights of others to support any candidate of their choice and see no reason why anyone should get angry and jittery over mine.
Two. I did not choose Atiku for pecuniary or any other gain. I have not been paid by him or anybody acting on his behalf. I would not sell myself where the future of my country, Nigeria, is concerned. As I write, I’m already on my way to Oxford University to resume and engage in academic ventures for the next six months. I’m gainfully employed and happy and content to manage my modest income, so I’m not desperate for government appointment or patronage, as the social media trolls try to suggest about opposition figures.
But I cannot watch my country disintegrate or watch an incompetent government drown our dear beloved country in an ocean of bigotry, backwardness, bitterness and bestiality. I owe it to myself, and fellow compatriots, to stand for truth, and nothing but the truth, as one of those it has pleased God to give some visibility and voice globally. What shall it profit a man who keeps silent in the face of unbridled tyranny and abysmal cluelessness. If I wished, I could have supported PDP in the 2015 elections. Every comfort was assured and guaranteed. But I chose to support a supposed poor man we believed would be a Mandela figure that would rescue us from the scourge of PDP. Little did I imagine we were in the process of inviting a worse pestilence on our nation.
Three. I bear no grudge or personal animosity against Buhari. I love him the way I love mankind and respect the office he occupies which I once attempted to enter when I contested in 2011. I believe President Muhammadu Buhari has not reciprocated the massive goodwill bestowed on him in 2015 and that he has treated us with great contempt and disdain. He has also not properly utilised his professional, competent and capable Vice-President, Professor Yemi Osinbajo. Had he done so, maybe we would now be saying something else.
This is not to cause any disaffection within their ranks, but every discerning Nigerian knows that this quintessential gentleman is the reason that there is any real noteworthy success for this administration. Otherwise, Buhari has embarrassed his supporters, endlessly, with his reckless, insensitive and uninformed decisions. What many of those supporting him in public today say behind him is unbelievable and unspeakable. I have friends who confess to private threats of business and physical annihilation and are thus forced to endorse a man they know can never take Nigeria to anywhere meaningful, even if given four terms.
Four. I have tried strenuously to be fair to Buhari and wrote copiously to advise him, from time to time, as I promised him when we met in his office, one on one, in 2015. I gave up hope, after some time, when I saw the direction he was headed and noticed the irredeemable obstinacy in his DNA. Four years ago, many of us were very excited about the hope this great General offered to our nation. Perhaps, we overrated his capabilities. It has become clear that we wittingly dressed him in borrowed robes and we were all hypnotised and brainwashed, somehow. Today, our eyes have cleared from that giddiness and I’m ready to add my voice to those of others who genuinely believe, Buhari must go. I do this with every sense of responsibility to God and to my country. I will give my reasons shortly.
I have had to apologise in the last couple of months to those who feel very aggrieved that a self-confessed democrat like me could ever support a blatant dictator like Buhari. You can never imagine the gale of verbal attacks I suffered and endured for what I considered my innocuous support. The last one that really hit me was in Ghana recently.
I ran into the respected Legal luminary, Mr Olisa Agbakoba, SAN, at the lounge in Kotoka International Airport. There were two ladies seated with him, one of who I believe is his wife. I greeted them but the other lady snubbed me, and said, “Dele, I will never greet you.” I looked blank and wondered if we’ve ever met, and how I might have offended her. Madam soon threw a sucker punch. “Dele, you are one of those who brought that disaster called Buhari on us…” and she went into her tirade. I tried to explain that I’m indeed very sorry and it was not my fault that I fell for the charms and scam of APC. The woman was practically inconsolable.
I have encountered many people like her. A guy almost went physical with me on a flight to London, grumbling aloud about how some of Buhari’s ignorant decisions have messed up Nigeria, his business and family. All I could do was plead for understanding. Unfortunately, Buhari himself is totally oblivious to the way Nigerians feel or just couldn’t be bothered or is probably insulated from objective criticism by selfish advisers. The tragedy of it all is his Messianic complex. He and his cronies behave as if Nigerians owe them a load of gratitude for favours received. Such hocus-pocus and inanity.
I have no iota of doubt left in me that President Muhammadu Buhari has performed well below expectations and that he should be voted out, peacefully, on February 16, 2019. The message should be clear henceforth that there is no automatic second term for incompetence, irresponsibility, irreverence and impunity. It is a miracle that Nigeria has not exploded into a civil war with the manner Buhari has treated some parts as second-class citizens with no right to complain. Let me now give reasons why we cannot afford to donate a second term to Buhari when he has clearly not earned it.
One. At 76, and with a failing health, Buhari should go into permanent retirement at the expiration of his tenure on May 29, 2019. No man can cheat nature and Buhari isn’t an exception.
Two. Buhari has not been in charge or on top of government and governance since he assumed office on May 29, 2015. Some cronies, otherwise known and addressed as ‘the cabal’, have been ruling without being elected. This can only get worse if Buhari is awarded a second term through our collective stupidity.
Three. The human rights record of Buhari has never been anything to praise or applaud at any time. Nothing has changed since he was kicked out of power by President Ibrahim Babangida in 1985. He has refused to adhere to the rule of law and has continued to trample on the rights of Nigerian citizens despite several court orders. What makes matters worse is that he behaves like Constantin Demiris, a character in Sidney Sheldon’s Memories of Midnight, who never forgets a favour and never forgives an injury. He has kept his presumed enemies in prison, indefinitely and compensated a few of his benefactors with appointments.
Buhari does not hold the Constitution of Nigeria dear to heart and as such behaves with maximum use of force. His goons have been harassing the Legislature and the Judiciary on the pretext that they are fighting corruption, but they deliberately target those they consider inimical to their hold on power. They have invaded homes of Judges in the middle of the night, breaking down doors, and swarmed on the National Assembly with thugs and later with hooded and gun-totting secret agents in broad daylight. He has suspended the Chief Justice of Nigeria when he has neither the authority nor the power to do so. Buhari and those who support this brigandage and total assault on recognised and reverent principles of law and established constitutional institutions choose to forget that the worst kind of corruption is the abuse of power itself. When it is for ulterior and base motives, as is now obviously the case, it becomes a menace that all well-meaning and true democrats must resist with all their might. There can be no excuse or justification. Otherwise we may as well embrace not just dictatorship, but anarchy.
Four. Buhari has been a divisive leader who appears not to believe in the unity of Nigeria. Under his government, Nigeria and Nigerians have been more divided. The lop-sidedness of his security appointments have been dangerously fixated on people of the same ethnic group and religious persuasion, and he does it with nonchalance and condescension. If you like, jump into the Atlantic Ocean, our President won’t blink an eye. He claims, with a straight face that he makes appointments on merit, but we’ve not seen the reflection and positive effects of this merit on the war against corruption, terrorists and insurgents.
Five. Buhari’s economic blueprint has been more involved in his stereotypical tightening up the noose on the economy, scaring investors away with ill-thought economic policies and reversal of contractual obligations without negotiations with parties involved, instead of opening up the economy. This has all happened because of his obsession with so-called corruption. Yet, under his watch, not much has been achieved because of his desperation to hold on to power. This has forced him to compromise, capitulate and led him to bring the biggest and possibly most corrupt chieftains of other parties closer to him.
He turns the proverbial blind eye to the infamous activities of these nefarious characters because they are perceived as being able to achieve his unbridled ambition for a second term. He had lost elections on three previous occasions and only won when he got the so-called bad guys to help him attain power. Right now, he is heavily relying on them again to bail him out of imminent defeat next week. And this is the man who falsely claims to espouse anti-corruption credentials and touts himself as a man of integrity.
Six. Buhari has failed spectacularly on all his major campaign promises. Nigeria is far worse than he met it. I will be the first to congratulate the government on its achievements in the rail sector and also the success with the militant problem in the Niger Delta. Other than that, he could not even stabilise what he inherited talk less of improving on it. His government has been struggling to control the free-fall of the Naira against the Dollar. He has not been able to cancel and eliminate fuel subsidies which he once described as a big scam and on which the corruption fight has been largely hinged. In fact, payments have more than doubled and the NNPC now holds a monopoly on importation of petroleum products with attendant risk of corruption in high places. We are none the wiser about security spending by him. This was the second plank on which the anti-corruption war was predicated. Loans have ballooned astronomically, yet infrastructure development remains outlandishly backward. We only get to read about monumental achievements on paper.
Seven. The last but not the least in my view is the perpetual and puerile blame game. Four years after getting power from PDP, Buhari has not stopped blaming his predecessors, forgetting that this was precisely the reason PDP was sacked from power. Buhari won those elections not on his own accord, but because the general populace had become totally disenchanted with PDP, it’s profligacy, looting and mendacity. Sadly, It seems we have come full circle.
Since Buhari has shown the inability to perform the magic he promised, it is time to send him back home, with the sure message that whosoever comes next will suffer the same fate. It is a democratic template we must put in place now and forever. Otherwise, we must accept whatever fate befalls our dear country.
The world is watching.
Written by Dele Momodu